Panna National Park

Kanha National Park

Total Coverage Area: 940 sq. kms
Surrounded Area: Surrounded by 100, 500 hectares of additional buffer area.
Extended In: 1933 as a sanctuary
Later Developed As: A National Park 1955 & As a Tiger Reserve In 1975.

tiger in Kanha National ParkKanha National park is located in Banjar and Halon valleys in the Mandla / Balaghat districts of the state of Madhya Pradesh. Kanha National Park is one of the India's finest tiger reserves. It is spread more than 940 sq km in a horse shoe shaped valley bound by the spurs of the Mekal range the park presents a varies topography.

About Kanha National Park:

Kanha National Park is Kipling country and the nearby forests were the setting for the "Jungle Book" by Rudyard Kipling. It's an outstanding national park and wildlife reserve of Central India, noted for its last remaining population of the hard-ground race of the Swamp Deer (approximately 380). Spotting wild animals is always a matter of luck, but Kanha is so rich in wildlife that the odds are titled in your favour. Most people are keener to meet Kanha's most famous citizen: the Tiger. Thereare a healthy numbers of the Tiger found over here, which may be seen during the day, and is one of the best places left to see them.

royal bengal tiger in Kanha National ParkThere are 175 varieties of birds in Kanha National Park. So if you happen to be bird watcher, look forward to a full spotting itinerary. The terrain inside the park is varied, nonetheless enjoyable. Bamboo forests flow into Sal forests and meadows. There are herds of spotted deer to be seen with smaller herds of spotted deer to be seen with smaller herds of beautiful antelope, the black buck. With a little luck, you could also spot the timorous barking deer. It's snapping warns other denizens of the forest that a predator is around. There is also a very strong possibility that you will see the rare Barasingha, the Swamp Deer. Once there were only 66 of these in Kanha, but careful conservation and management raised their population to over 400.

It was at Kanha that the eminent zoologist George Schaller undertook the first ever-scientific study of the tiger. Another landmark at Kanha is the preservation of the 'hard ground' Barasingha. This was achieved by extending the grasslands, relocating villages and by increasing habitat.

The Topography(Kanha National Park):

Bengal tiger in KanhaKanha has two main valleys, Halon in the east and Banjar in the west, and the grassy 'maidans' (often old village sites), dotted with clumps of forest harbour large numbers of herbivores. The hills offer support sizeable plateaus (locally called 'Dadars') and the characterized by extensive grasslands and scant trees. These 'Dadars' are much favoured by Gaur and Four-horned Antelope.

The forests are deciduous, the main tree being the Sal, and there are large stands of bamboo. Higher up the slopes the forests tend to become dense and mixed with Haldu and Bija trees. Birds in the park include the Painted Partridge, Shaheen Falcon and Golden Oriole.

Birding in the Kanha National Park:

Cattle Egret, Pond Heron, Black Ibis, Common Peafowl, Crested Serpent, Racket-Tailed Drongo, Hawk Eagle, Woodpecker, Pigeon, Dove, Parakeet, Babbler and Mynah, Indian Roller, White-Breasted Kingfisher and Gray Hornbill.

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